Luggage lock troubles

05.10.2017 18:32

Back in August an annoying thing happened while I was traveling in Germany. My luggage lock wouldn't open. I was pretty sure I had the right combination, but the damn thing would not let me get to my things. I tried some other numbers that came to mind and a few futile attempts at picking it. I then sat down and went through all 1000 combinations. It would still not open. At that point it was around 1 am, I had a long bus ride that day and desperately needed a shower and sleep. I ran out of patience, took the first hard object that came to hand and broke off the lock. Thankfully, that only took a few moments.

Broken luggage combination lock.

This is the culprit, reassembled back to its original shape after the fact. It's a type of a 3-digit combination lock that locks the two zipper handles on the main compartment of the suitcase. It came off an "Easy Trip" suitcase of a Chinese origin. It's obviously just a slight inconvenience for anyone wanting to get in, but I didn't want to ruin my suitcase and dragging my clothes through a narrow crack made by separating the zipper with a ballpoint pen felt uncivilized.

Inside luggage combination lock in locked position.

This is how inside of the lock looks like in the locked position. There are three discs with notches, one for each digit. Placed over them is a black plastic latch with teeth that align with the notches. In the locked position, the latch is pushed right by the discs against the horizontal spring in the middle right. In this position, the two protrusions on the top of the latch prevent the two metal bolts from rotating in. The bolts go through the loops in the zipper handles. They also connect to the button on the other side of the lock, so in this position the button can't be moved.

Inside luggage combination lock in unlocked position.

When the right combination is entered, the teeth on the latch match the notches on the discs. The spring extends, snaps the latch left and moves it out of the way of the bolts. The button can be pressed and the bolts rotate to free the zipper.

So, what went wrong with my lock? When I removed the lock from the suitcase, the spring that moves the latch was freely rattling inside the case. Without it, the latch will not move on its own, even when the right combination is set. I think this is the likely cause of my troubles. The spring does not have a proper seat on the fixed end, so it seems likely that a strong enough knock on the lock could displace it. I guess that is not beyond the usual abuse luggage experiences in air travel. After replacing the spring the lock works just fine. I'm not using it again though.

Would it be possible to get my toiletries in a less destructive way? If I knew that the problem was the displaced spring, the solution would be simply to set the right combination, make sure the button is not pressed to remove friction on the latch and then rotate the suitcase until gravity moved the latch out of the way. Another possibility would be to pen the zipper and then unscrew the lock from the inside. Unscrewed lock is easily disassembled and removed from the zipper handles, but finding the screws and space for a screwdriver might be impractical with a full suitcase.

Posted by Tomaž | Categories: Life | Comments »