HiFiBerry follow up

11.06.2017 20:59

Back in December I was writing about problems with a HiFiBerry audio interface for Raspberry Pi. The audio board was apparently emitting interference on the 2.4 GHz frequency band and made the wireless LAN connection on the Raspberry Pi unreliable. I got in contact with their support and they acknowledged that the oscillators on that version of their hardware had an EMI problem. They promised to get back when they've fixed the issue and indeed in April they offered to replace the old board free of charge or sell me a new one for half the price. I opted for the latter option, since I was curious what changes they made to the design and wanted to compare the boards side-by-side.

HiFiBerry DAC+ HW 2.2

This is the old board, marked HiFiBerry DAC+ HW 2.2. The components marked with X44 and X48 are Fox Electronics Xpresso-series hybrid oscillator modules. Each of these contains an integrated circuit and a quartz crystal resonator. Unfortunately they are unmarked and I didn't bother to measure their frequency. From their designations I'm guessing one provides the clock for the 44100 Hz sampling rate and the other for 48000 Hz. Datasheet for the PCM5122 ADC suggests that the oscillators themselves are in the 10 MHz range and the clocks are then divided down inside the ADC chip.

HiFiBerry DAC+ HW 2.6

This is the new board I got. It's marked HW 2.6. The gold hybrids have been replaced with similar looking components in black plastic packages. Xpresso-series has apparently been discontinued. The new oscillators are marked only with letters BOHXA and after a brief web search I didn't manage to find their manufacturer. The new board also omits the push-button. I'm not sure what its original function was anyway.

Here are the two photographs superimposed to highlight the differences:

Comparison of HiFiBerry DAC+ HW 2.2 and 2.6

Apart from the new oscillator hybrids the most obvious change is the removal of two large copper fills on the top layer of the PCB. These large areas of copper on the top layer are all connected to the 3.3V supply. The bottom layer of the board remains one big ground plane.

Copper fill stub near the oscillators on HW 2.2.

The copper fill near the oscillators looks especially suspicious. It was only connected to the 3.3V supply with a narrow bridge between the pins of P4 on the right. It provided supply voltage to U4 and nothing else further down to the left side. It seems like it could accidentally form a quarter-wave stub antenna. It's approximately 25 mm in length, so the resonance could well be somewhere in the GHz range. This is near enough to the 2.4 GHz band that I think it would be feasible for it transmit some oscillator harmonics out from the board.

It would be interesting to see if this stub was indeed causing the problems. It should be easy to drill a hole through and decouple the left end of it with a SMD capacitor to the ground plane on the bottom layer. I could then repeat the near-field measurements I did last year to confirm. I'm not sure if I will bother though. The new board does indeed fix the problem with the Raspberry Pi built-in Wi-Fi radio and I currently don't have any particular use for another audio board.

Posted by Tomaž | Categories: Analog | Comments »

Repairing what wasn't broken

04.06.2017 21:10

Last time when I was tinkering with the insides of my portable CRT TV (UTV 6007) I happened to notice one more odd thing. One of the smaller through-hole resistors near the high-voltage transformer looked charred from heat. Ever since this TV was new it had a little bit of that characteristic smell of overheated electronics. However it worked fine, so I didn't worry too much about it and it's not unusual for cheap plastic to smell a bit when heated. But this here looked serious enough to look into it even though from the outside there were still no apparent problems.

Blackened R75 near the high-voltage transformer.

The size of the resistor suggested a 1/8 W rating. The body was too blackened to read out the colors. The position is marked with R75 and the silkscreen print underneath helpfully says it should be 1 kΩ. However I've seen that other resistors on this board sometimes don't match the values printed for their positions. Out of the circuit, the resistor measured around 900 Ω, which seemed consistent with a slightly damaged 1 kΩ. Just to be sure, I traced the circuit around it to see what its function was.

The following is the relevant part of the circuit on the main board around the HVT. Only the low-voltage secondary winding providing a few 100 V for the first anode is shown here.

Circuit around the HVT in UTV 6007.

I also traced the small circular board that sits directly on top of the electron gun pins and is connected to the main board with a (very flimsy looking) 4-wire flat cable.

Small circuitboard on top of the electron gun.

I didn't find the exact pin-out for this tube, so take the pin markings with a grain of salt. However this pin-out seems consistent with how the typical cathode ray tube is connected. For reference I used the one shown in the KA2915 datasheet and a few old TV schematics my father found in his library.

The small circuit on top of CRT pins.

The cathode K has a positive bias relative to the ground. The bias can be adjusted with the Brightness knob. The first grid G1 is grounded and is hence negative relative to the cathode. First anode A1 is on a higher positive bias relative to the ground and is hence positive relative to the cathode. The second grid G2 either isn't present in this tube or is grounded as well. There is no apparent focus adjustment. The video signal is connected to the cathode. It varies cathode potential relative to the first grid and so controls the intensity of the electron beam and thus the brightness of the spot on the phosphor.

The capacitor and diode arrangement between A1, G1 and ground is interesting. Something similar is present on all CRT circuits I've seen (see D3 here for example, from this project). Its purpose might be to put a high negative bias on G1 to stop the electron beam when the device is turned off and A1 goes low. I know that a lingering electron beam in old TV sets sometimes burned out a spot in the screen if the beam didn't shut down before the deflection. This may be there to prevent that.

In any case, the R75 is in circuit that provides the anode voltage. Only the small anode current should flow through it, and the charging current for the 2.2 μF capacitor for a short time after the TV is turned on. It's not apparent what caused it to heat up so much. The capacitor seems fine, so perhaps something arced over at one point or the TV was turned on and off several times in short succession.

Replacement R75 resistor in UTV 6007.

Since the circuit seemed to be consistent with the suggested 1 kΩ value, I replaced the resistor with a new one. I used a standard 1/4 W carbon resistor I had at hand and left it on longer leads for better cooling if something similar happened again. As expected, the TV runs just as well with the new resistor in place as it did with the old burned up one. There's currently no sign of it overheating, but perhaps I'll check again after some time.

I love playing with this old stuff. Analog TV was one of the pinnacles of consumer analog technology and it's fascinating to see how optimized and well thought out it was at the end of its era. This particular specimen is surprisingly repairable for a device that I got new in the store for 20 €. Components are well marked on the silk screen print and most have their values printed out as well (even if those don't always match reality). The only thing more I could wish for is that I could run it with the case opened without a special contraption for holding the CRT.

Posted by Tomaž | Categories: Analog | Comments »