Newsletters and other beasts

23.07.2016 10:23

It used to be that whenever someone wrote something particularly witty on Slashdot, it was followed by a reply along the lines of "I find your ideas intriguing and would like to subscribe to your newsletter". Ten-odd years later, it seems like the web took that old Simpsons joke seriously. These days you can hardly follow a link on Hacker News without having a pop-up thrown in your face. Most articles now end with a plea for an e-mail address, and I've even been to real-life talks where the speakers continuously advertised their newsletter to the audience.

Recently I've been asked several times why I didn't support subscriptions by e-mail, like every other normal website. The short answer is that I keep this blog in a state that I wish other websites I visit would adopt. This means no annoying advertisements, respecting your privacy by not loading third-party Javascript or tracking cookies, HTTPS and IPv6 support, valid XHTML... and good support for the Atom standard. Following the death of Google Reader, the world turned against RSS and Atom feeds. However, I still find them vastly more usable than any alternative. It annoys me that I can't follow interesting people and projects on modern sites like Medium and Hackaday.io through this channel.

Twitter printer at 32C3

That said, you now can subscribe by e-mail to my blog, should you wish to do so (see also sidebar top-right). The thing that finally convinced me to implement this was hearing that some of you use RSS-to-email services that add their own advertisements to my blog posts. I did not make this decision lightly though. I used to host mailing lists and know what an incredible time sink they can be, fighting spam, addressing complaints and so on. I don't have that kind of time anymore, so using an external mass-mailing service was the only option. Running my own mail server in this era is lunacy enough.

Mailchimp seems to be friendly, so I'm using that at the moment. If turns to the dark side and depending how popular the newsletter gets, I might move to some other service - or remove it altogether. For the time being I consider this an experiment. It's also worth mentioning that while there are no ads, Mailchimp does add mandatory tracking features (link redirects and tracking pixels). Of course, it also collects your e-mail address somewhere.

Since I'm on the topic of subscriptions and I don't like writing meta posts like this, I would also like to mention here two ways of following my posts that are not particularly well known: if you are only interested in one particular topic I write about, you can search for it. Search results page has an attached Atom feed you can follow that only contains posts related to the query. If you on the other hand believe that Twitter is the new RSS, feel free to follow @aviansblog (at least until Twitter breaks the API again).

Posted by Tomaž | Categories: Life

Comments

Thanks for keeping the Atom feed online. I'm wondering if it could include the articles contents, instead of just the title. This way I would not even need to open the website to read the articles!

The main Atom feed already includes full article content (as well as a short summary). Check your feed reader settings - I know Firefox for instance only displays the summary, even if full text is also present in the file.

Feed from search results only has excerpts. Unfortunately that's a limitation of the search engine I'm using.

Posted by Tomaž

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