On cartoon horses and their lawyers

15.08.2014 19:14

GalaCon is an annual event that is about celebrating pastel colored ponies of all shapes and forms, from animation to traditional art and writing. It's one of the European counterparts to similar events that have popped up on the other side of the Atlantic in recent years. These gatherings were created in the unexpected wake of the amateur creativity that was inspired by Lauren Faust's reimagining of Hasbro's My Little Pony franchise. For the third year in a row GalaCon attracted people from as far away as New Zealand. It's a place where a sizable portion of the attendees wear at least a set of pony ears and a tail, if not a more elaborate equestrian-inspired attire. Needless to say, it can be a somewhat frightful experience at first and definitely not for everyone.

For most people it seems to be a place to get away from the social norms that typically prevent adults from obsessing over stories and imagery meant for audience half their age and often of the opposite gender. While I find the worshiping of creative talents behind the show a bit off-putting, I'm still fascinated by the amateur creations of this community. The artist's booths were a bit high on kitsch ("Incredible. Incredibly expensive" was one comment I overheard), but if you look into the right places on-line, there are still enjoyable and thoughtful stories, art and music to be found.

Meeting people I knew from their creations on the web was a fun experience. However for me this year's GalaCon was also a sobering insight into what kind of a strange mix of creativity, marketing psychology and legal matters goes into creating a cartoon for children these days.

GalaCon and Bronies e.V. flags at Forum am Schlosspark.

A highlight of the event was a panel by M. A. Larson, one of the writers behind the cartoon series. By going step by step through a thread of actual emails exchanged between himself, Lauren Faust and the Hasbro office he demonstrated the process behind creating a script for a single episode.

The exact topic of the panel was not announced beforehand however and all recording of the screen was prohibited, with staff patrolling the aisles to look for cameras. I don't know how much of that was for dramatic effect and how much due to real legal requirements. However even before the panel began that gave a strong impression of the kind of atmosphere a project like this is created in. Especially considering the episode he was discussing aired more then three years ago. I'm sure a lot of people in the audience could quote parts of that script by heart. It has been transcribed, analyzed to the last pixel, remixed and in general picked apart on the Internet years ago.

My Little Pony was called the end of the creator-driven era in animation. So far I thought marketing departments dictated what products should appear on the screen and which characters should be retired to make place for new toy lines. I was surprised to hear that sometimes Hasbro office gets involved even in details like which scene should appear last before the end of an act and the commercial break. That fact was even more surprising since this apparently happened in one of the earliest episodes where the general consensus seems to be that the show was not yet ruined by corporate control over creative talent.

Similar amount of thought seemed to go into possibilities of lawsuits. Larson mentioned their self-censorship of the idea to make characters go paragliding and have them do zip lining instead. Is it really harder to say in a court that some child has been hurt trying to imitate horses sliding along a wire than horses soaring under a parachute?

GalaCon 2014 opening ceremony.

The signs of the absurdity of intellectual property protection these days could also be seen throughout the event. Considering Bronies e.V. paid license fees for the public performance of the show it was ridiculous that they were using low-quality videos from the United States TV broadcasts for projection on the big cinema screen, complete with pop-up advertisements that didn't make sense.

Similarly, the love-hate relationship between copyright holders and non-commercial amateur works is nothing new to report. There were a lot of examples where rabid law firms, tasked with copyright protection and with only tenuous connections back to the mothership, used various extortion tactics to remove remixed content from the web. I still don't understand though what kind of a law justifies cease-and-desist letters for works inspired by unnamed background characters that only appeared for a couple of seconds in the original show.

Evening in front of the Forum am Schlosspark.

In general, GalaCon was a bit more chaotic experience than I would wish for and I left it with mixed feelings. Cartoon ponies on the internet are full of contradictions. While the stories they tell are inspiring and a welcome getaway from daily life, the money-grabs behind them are often depressing. I still believe in the good intentions of these events but the extravagant money throwing at the charity auction made me question a lot of things. With extra fees for faster queues, photos and autographs this year's event felt more like a commercial enterprise than a grassroots community event.

Posted by Tomaž | Categories: Life

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