EuroPython 2014 wrap-up

29.07.2014 14:08

I spent the last week at the EuroPython conference. Since my last visit three years ago, the largest European meeting of the Python community moved from Florence in Italy to the familiar Berlin's Congress Center in Alexanderplatz. Last 7 days were chock-full of talks about everything related to Python, friendly conversations with fellow developers and hacking on this and that odd part of the free software ecosystem. So much so actually that it was a welcome change to spend a day outside, winding down in one of Berlin's numerous parks.

EuroPython 2014 schedule poster in the basement of the BCC.

It was an odd feeling to be back in the BCC. So far I knew it only by the Chaos Communication Congresses it hosted before they moved back to Hamburg. I was half-expecting to see the signature Fairy dust rocket and black Datenpirat flags flying in the front. Instead, part of the front yard was converted to a pleasant outdoor lounge area with an ice cream stand while a bunch of sponsor booths took place of the hackcenter.

Traces of the German hacker scene and the community around the CCC could still be easily seen though. The ubiquitous Club Mate was served on each floor. Blinking All Colors Are Beautiful and Mate Light installations were placed on two floors of the conference center. A few speakers reminisced about the congresses and the CCC Video Operations Center took care of the video recordings with the efficiency we are used to from the Congresses. You could even hear a public request to use more bandwidth now and then.

Constanze Kurz talking about surveillance industry.

There were several talks with a surprisingly political topic for a conference centered around a programming language. I felt odd listening to the opening keynote from Constanze Kurz about one year of Snowden revelations and the involvement of big Internet companies while those same companies were hunting for new employees just outside the lecture hall. Still, I don't think it hurts to remind people that even purely technical work can have consequences in the society.

From the keynotes, it's also worth mentioning Emily Bache and her views on test driven development and the history and future of NumPy development by Travis Oliphant.

Even though I'm not doing as much Python development as I used to in my previous job, there were still plenty of interesting presentations. In the context of scientific computing in Python, I found the talks about the GR plotting framework, simulations with SimPy and probabilistic programming most interesting. Some interesting scientific projects relevant to my work were presented in the poster session as well, although I had problems later finding them on the web to learn more about them. Especially, the work on propagating measurement errors in numerical calculations done by Robert Froeschl at CERN caught my eye.

Park in front of the BCC for EuroPython attendants.

I also attended the matplotlib training, although I was a bit disappointed with it. I was hoping to learn more about advanced usage of this Python library I use daily in my work. I enjoyed the historical examples of data visualization and general advice on how to present graphs in a readable way. However most of the technical details behind plotting and data manipulation weren't new to me and we ran out of time before digging into more advanced topics. I guess it was my fault though, since I now see that the training has a novice tag.

Going away from the topics strictly connected to my work, the talks about automated testing with a simple robot and using Kinect in Python left me with several crazy ideas for potential future projects.

Open Contracting table at EuroPython 2014 sprints.

During the weekend I joined the Open Contracting coding sprint. Jure and I represented our small Open Data group in helping to develop tools for governments to publish information about public tenders and contracts in a standard format. My result from these two days is the jsonmerge library, which deserves a blog post of its own.

In conclusion, I enjoyed EuroPython 2014 immensely. In contrast for instance with 30C3 last year, it was again one of the those events where I got to talk with an unusually large number of people during coffee breaks and social events.

On the other hand, attending it made me realize how much my interests changed after I left Zemanta. I visited Florence during my last days at that job and I was intimately familiar in all nuances of the Python interpreter. There I joined the spring hacking on the CPython distribution. This year however I was more interested in what Python can offer to me as a tool and not that much in developing Python itself.

Posted by Tomaž | Categories: Life

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